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CRICKET UMPIRE SIGNALS GUIDE


CRICKET UMPIRE SIGNALS GUIDE by 11ic Blog

In cricket, an umpire is a person empowered under the laws of cricket to make decisions regarding events on the cricket field. As well as making decisions about the legality of bowling, appeals for wickets and the general conduct of the game in a lawful manner, the umpire also keeps a record of bowls and announces the completion of an over.


If you are watching a cricket match, live or on TV, it will help you follow the match if you understand the different umpire signals. This also applies to players, so read on.


OUT

An Out decision means that the umpire has accepted an appeal from the fielding side and the batsman has been dismissed. The batsman is now "out" and must leave the pitch.






NOT OUT


If an "out" decision is successfully overturned in review, the umpire must confirm that the batsman is "not out". Note that turning down an on-field call does not require the referee to signal out. A nod or a "not out" call is enough.




NO BALL


This signal is made when a bowler has sent an illegal delivery which constitutes a No ball under the law. One run is added to the batting side's total (two runs in some forms of limited overs cricket).



FREE HIT


It is follow by certain types of deliveries. The batsman can now hit the ball without being sent back, except by run out, obstructing the pitch, or hit the ball twice.






WIDE BALL


When a wide ball passes the batsman and is considered out of reach when in its normal position. One run is added to the batting team's total, and the pitcher must throw that ball again. Wide can also be given based on height.




Four runs are signaled when the ball crosses the boundary after bouncing at least once. Four runs are added to the batting side's total. If the four runs result from a bye, leg bye, no ball or wide, the umpire will give the relevant signal before signaling four runs.





Six runs are scored when the batter hits the ball over the boundary without it bouncing. Six runs are then added to the batting team total.





BYE


A bye is scored when the ball goes past the stumps and the batsmen are able to run. The ball must not touch the bat or any part of the body. The number of runs completed will be added to the team total.




LEG BYE


Leg byes are counted when the batsmen run after the ball has touched the batter’s leg or any part of his body other than the glove. The number of runs completed is added to the team's batting total.




BOUNCER


If a ball bounces above shoulder height, the umpire signals a bouncer. The pitcher and batsmen will be notified that a bouncer has been called and the appropriate short pitch restrictions will apply.





DRS OR THIRD UMPIRE


The batting or fielding team can activate the decision review system if they wish to review a decision on the field. The third referee will review the decision and confirm or cancel it.





DEAD BALL


A dead ball can be called in various circumstances. Typically, the batsman can pull out when the bowler is in their delivery stride. The dead ball does not count as a delivery and must be bowled again.





SHORT RUN


If a batsman fails to drive his bat past the popping crease, the umpire shall call a short run. The incomplete run is not added to the team's batting total.






Penalty runs are awarded to the batting or bowling sides for a variety of different offenses. The number of runs, usually 5, is added to the team's total.






REVOKE DECISION


A decision is canceled if it is overturned by the third referee in review. The initial decision is then reversed.







POWERPLAY


Power plays apply in limited overs cricket with fielding regulations. The related power play will now begin.







SOFT SIGNAL


The soft signal is an indication to the third referee of how the decision is more likely to go. The third referee must refute the soft signal beyond a reasonable doubt or he will uphold it.






NEW BALL


In first-class cricket, a new ball may be taken every 80 overs. The field team can now take the new ball.







LAST HOUR


First class cricket has a final hour on the last day of play. Now the last hour begins.






CANCEL CALL


If for some reason the referee has made a wrong decision, he can use the cancel signal. The original signal is now canceled and no longer exists.







Final Thoughts

If you have read these signals, you should now have a better understanding of cricket. Who knows, you might even take that knowledge a step further and become a local umpire yourself.

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